Saturday, October 19, 2013

Tangents inspired by "The Liars' Club" and "Lit" by Mary Karr

I've been slowly making my way though Mary Karr's stunning memoir the Liar's Club in my spare time for something like a month now, but it wasn't until a recent 15 hour plane flight that I had a chance to sit down and and finish it.

I love everything about Liar's Club, its sequel Lit (which I actually read first for some reason) and Karr herself. Her talent, her dry humor, her uncompromising cynicism, her wit, her gift for quick incisive characterization, and her ability to starkly expose and examine her own behavior all make me respect her enormously. Plus, I really enjoy it whenever someone interviews her (prime examples here and here).

Karr's memoirs are full of unlikely events, often fueled by manic instability and substance abuse. Its consistently surprising, often shocking. But the thing that strikes me most about Karr's work, especially having given it a couple of weeks to settle, is probably the way she makes God not-quite-so-unpalatable.

I haven't been much of a God person lately. Like the last 15 years or so. Much of a God person is how I described it to a coworker once, thereby inserting my foot into my mouth. I've hung onto the phrase since. Its a handy way to articulate my exact position--beyond agnostic, but not quite all the way up to the rabid atheism that makes you want to actually argue with people. It also seems to suggest to the super-religious that I'm too lazy and ignorant to make big conversion points, which is handy.

What I generally keep to myself is that I really used to believe in a big way, and that there are times I really wish I still could. I remember the comfort there is in faith, the mystery, the sense of purpose, the incredible scope inherent in the idea of God--its something no other atheist I've known personally has really been able to appreciate.

These days, I'm sometimes too apt (like the other liberal democrat city-dwellers) to think of religious practice as a kind of mass delusion embraced by the weak, the shallow, the victimized, the under-educated, and the controlling, hateful charlatans who hope to take advantage of them. In fits of politically correct tolerance, I even occasionally fall back on the anthropological approach, which basically boils down to 'why would anyone think this shit.' (NB: Nothing makes you look like an asshole quite like speculating on the possible motivations of people you have never met. Political figures are exempt from this rule.)

But when smart, snarky feminist Mary Karr talks about her conversion--to Catholicism of all things--it reminds me of everything I admire and respect in true religious devotion. Rigor, discipline, scholarship, accountability, and most of all living in a conscious and conscientious way, investing small acts with mindfulness, engaging in a level of reflection otherwise almost unheard of in day-to-day existence. A religious expression that is personal and genuine--not just a string of catch phrases repeated by rote, but an evolving experience, the hard work of being an honest and decent human being.

I don't want to give the wrong impression. There's a lot more in these works then religion--God doesn't occupy more than about three chapters across the both books--but that's what I keep returning to in retrospect.